ISS Photos from Chris: #CatchLuca December 6-12

iss_over_aosta

“Location is Aosta, in north-western Italy (45°44′14″N 7°19′14″E). Picture was taken with a very standard pocket camera, with an 8 seconds exposure.” – Chris

In this final week of CatchLuca, I want to say a big thank you to every single contributor who shared a photo with me while Astronaut Luca Parmitano was aboard the ISS. Seeing the incredible outpouring of enthusiasm and support of this venture really showed how much international cooperation is continuing to develop. It was so much fun to see the variety of pictures of the ISS from all over the world – we caught Luca in so many different environments with so many different backdrops and in so many different circumstances. Thank YOU for making the CatchLuca experience so valuable for everyone!

Final Pictures of the ISS

This week, the final week of CatchLuca, features another single dedicated photographer who shared a series of ISS photos with me. Chris (@Chris_Diemoz), from Aosta, Italy, shared a few amazing photos throughout my CatchLuca submission period. Thank you so much to Chris for being generous enough to share so many great photos of the ISS! So happy and thankful that he’s caught the #ISSwave just like me!

June 6, 2013

"While I was waiting for the ATV4 to fly over us, ISS passed by. I had no tripod, but just a little wall in front of my house, and even if shaky (8 secs exposure), the result is an unusual "let's hide behind a roof" effect." - Chris

“While I was waiting for the ATV4 to fly over us, ISS passed by. I had no tripod, but just a little wall in front of my house, and even if shaky (8 secs exposure), the result is an unusual “let’s hide behind a roof” effect.” – Chris

June 12, 2013

"Picture taken at 20.57z in Aosta, north-western Italy (45°44′14″N 7°19′14″E). ISS comes from the upper-left side, while the city quietly moves to the end of the day. Standard pocket camera, with 8 seconds exposure." - Chris

“Picture taken at 20.57z in Aosta, north-western Italy (45°44′14″N 7°19′14″E). ISS comes from the upper-left side, while the city quietly moves to the end of the day. Standard pocket camera, with 8 seconds exposure.” – Chris

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